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Growing up, grandpa’s 1957 Chevy sat dead in the driveway.  My brothers and I often sat behind the wheel and traveled the highways of our imagination.

My driver’s permit in hand, dad said, “I’ve got an idea.”

Hours of labor later, the Chevy purred.  I helped too.

“Nothin’ comes for free,” my dad told me.

I cherished the time spent with him. Moving on with a family of my own, the Chevy rested in our back yard.  My kids soared the same highways.  Until my daughter arrived home one day with her driver’s permit.

“I’ve got an idea!” I said.

~~

Inspired by “Friday Fictioneers,” a weekly challenge to write a story using only 100 words and hosted by the lovely Rochelle Wisoff Fields.  If you would like to read other stories or join in by adding your own take on the photo supplied by Ted Strutz, visit HERE.

56 Comments Add yours

  1. neilmacdon says:

    I liked the cyclicity of this

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m glad you liked it. Thanks so much, Neil!

      Like

  2. pennygadd51 says:

    And so families bond and pass down skills and ways of sharing. Lovely metaphor, Brenda

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for the encouraging words, Penny! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  3. ceayr says:

    Simply but elegantly told.
    Love it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Your comment makes me smile. Thanks, CE!

      Like

  4. gahlearner says:

    This is becoming a lovely traditon. Beautiful story.

    Like

    1. I’m fond of tradition. Thank you for your lovely comment! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. trentpmcd says:

    Great story, very well told. If Ted’s photo is any indication, the repair work won’t be quite as easy as back in Dad’s day 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, I’m very happy you liked the story! It will indeed be more of a challenge, but the time spent together will create wonderful memories that will be priceless. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. trentpmcd says:

        Yes, priceless 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. draliman says:

    Nice, the cycle of life continues 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s right! Thanks for commenting. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Dale says:

    And so it goes, round and round, one generation to the next. Lovely, Brenda.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Dale. I’m glad you enjoyed the story. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Jelli says:

    Awesome story! I inherited an old car, too, when I first started to drive. It was a big, ugly station wagon… full size… and spray painted bright blue. An eyesore on it’s best day. Mom would say “If you can parrallel park the “Bomb” (it’s name) you can park anything” … she was right. We bought it at the junkyard for $5… no engine. rotted tires… Brought it home and spent the summer rebuilding it, inside and out. I hated that old clunker, for sure… but now, looking back, I miss it. I learned so much… I hated that, too. It wasn’t ‘girlie’ to get greasy… and grew to love the concept of restoration that I’ve carried with me into many realms. Wish I had a pic of the “Bomb” to share. Thanks for the memory… ~ Jelli

    Like

    1. I wish you had a photo to share too! I learned to drive in a paneled station wagon in the ’70s. Those things were huge and unwieldy so I can relate. I love your story. It’s funny what we remember fondly years later. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Jelli says:

        That’s what it was, one of those old paneled stationwagons, the wood panels were all rotten so we took them off. Tell ya, put the terror of parallel parking into me so bad… but then, I was the only one in my class who could do it pulling in rather than backing…even passed my driving test that way, much to the Test Proctor’s amusement.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Iain Kelly says:

    Lovely sweet story Brenda, of the things that can bring families together.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks so much, Iain! The story was influenced by my husband’s father, who didn’t spend much time with the family but came back around when my husband was a sixteen year old, for a time, with a 1967 Mustang that the two of them rebuilt. I think key moments such as these are the building blocks for who we become.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. michael1148humphris says:

    A spot on story, which I enjoyed reading

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so happy you enjoyed reading, Michael! 🙂

      Like

  11. plaridel says:

    memories are made of these. great post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Important moments are important. Thanks so much for commenting! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Great short story. My grandparents had an old car parked in some trees that had a very similar look to your picture. 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you were reminded of such a fond memory. Thanks so much for reading and your kind comment! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Abhijit Ray says:

    And the tradition was passed on from one generation to another. I wonder if the Chevvy would survive till your granddaughter gets her permit.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. What a wonderful notion, another generation to come. 🙂

      Like

  14. Create Space says:

    Beautifully told Brenda, and isn’t life like a fast car, it can pass us by so quickly! Our daughter just got her permit feels like only months ago I got mine!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Wonderfully true metaphor. My mind tells me I’m in my 20’s (well more like my 30’s) but the mirror and my body don’t agree. 🙂 Thank you for your kind comment!

      Like

      1. Create Space says:

        I’m the very same Brenda, why doesn’t our mind feel our age…or maybe it’s a great thing that it doesn’t…it’s keeping us young!

        Liked by 1 person

  15. Time’s circle, it goes round and round. I liked the gentleness in this story, I could almost feel the words purring.

    Like

    1. Wow, I love this. Thank you so much for your encouraging comment! 🙂

      Like

  16. Lynn Love says:

    A lovely tale of continuation and connecting with past generations. Nicely done Brenda

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Lynn! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Dear Brenda,

    What a sweet story of generations and a treasured car. Love it.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so happy you enjoyed the story. Thanks so much for letting me know, Rochelle. 🙂

      Like

  18. Margaret says:

    A lovely idea that the parent gets to pass on such a great experience from her? youth to her own daughter. Beautifully told.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Margaret! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  19. Sandra says:

    Lovely story, and so the circle continues. That car might be quite valuable by now.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It would certainly be a valuable car now. Thanks so much for commenting! 🙂

      Like

  20. It’s a great idea, but it might be harder a second time… but if the get it purring again it can be a great asset for her.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Difficult the second time around but a really cool car for her if it happens! Thanks for commenting, Bjorn!

      Like

  21. That would be the coolest car to have as a teenager!
    Might break the bank at the gas station…but still…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I hadn’t thought about that. It would certainly be a gas guzzler, but you’re right, a cool car to drive. Thanks for commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Such a beautiful tale of old car, memories, kids’ imagination and history repeating itself!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for commenting, Anshu! I’m glad you enjoyed the story.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Sounds like with continued care and attention this car will run forever

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m not sure how I missed this. Thank you so much for commenting! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  24. granonine says:

    I love the generational flow here, and the good relationships.

    If I may, a grammatical note: A common error is to begin your sentence with a modifier that does not apply to the subject. Example: ” Growing up, Grandpa’s Chevy. . . .” The Chevy wasn’t growing u p 🙂 Suggested correction: “Growing up, my siblings and I enjoyed Grandpa’s old Chevy .”
    Also, “My driver’s permit in hand, dad said. . . ” Who was holding the permit? Sounds like dad was, but I think you meant you were. Suggested fix: When dad saw the driver’s permit in my hand, he said. . . ”

    I really liked “My kids soared the same highways.” Reminded me of the pretending I did in my grandpa’s truck 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Linda, for your feedback. I truly appreciate it!! I’m glad you enjoyed the phrasing. I have two older brothers and two younger sisters. We had so much fun within our imaginations. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Varad says:

    Lovely little tale that came right around. Well done, Brenda

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Varad! =)

      Like

  26. lisarey1990 says:

    Lovely. The metaphor is great.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so glad you enjoyed the story. Thanks so much!

      Liked by 1 person

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