Remember

I can’t recall the accident. The night my car stalled on the tracks. Surfacing from a deep slumber, the doctor told me I had slept for nearly two months. I woke as a newborn. My mind a blank slate.

The people gathered gaze at me. They expect me to know them. I do not.

He walks into the room. Another person I’m supposed to know. He must have been someone special by the look in his eyes, a mixture of sadness and longing. He places roses in a vase on my nightstand.

I remember roses.

I remember loving him.

~~

“Friday Fictioneers” is a weekly challenge hosted by Rochelle Wisoff Fields. The challenge is to write a story, using only 100 words, in response to a photo prompt. This week’s photo was provided by our lovely host, Rochelle. It’s a lot of fun to join this fantastic and encouraging group of writers! If you would like to read other stories, visit HERE.

70 Comments Add yours

  1. notestowomen says:

    Lovely story, Brenda. The last two lines are very encouraging.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Adele. I’m happy you enjoyed it. =)

      Like

  2. neilmacdon says:

    Great story and a very adventurous theme to explore in 100 words

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I appreciate your encouraging comment, Neil! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Iain Kelly says:

    Lovely, and the sense of hope at the end that her mind may come back to her. Nicely done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much, Iain! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  4. granonine says:

    Flower power 🙂 Lovely story!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love that … “Flower power!” Thank you, Linda. =)

      Liked by 1 person

    2. 4963andypop says:

      Coming out of a coma, the period of conscious but disoriented recovery can be so confusing to the loved ones. As well as to the injured person. Her lack of emotional connection to her visitors in the first part is distressing to behold. But at the end you give us hope, that her amnesia will be only temporary.

      Our family was dealt a similar hand, but fortunately full recovery was in the cards. 😊

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I’m sorry your family experienced this but so glad full recovery occurred. I can’t even begin to imagine the trauma of not remembering and the huge expectations that are placed on the person who experiences amnesia. Loved ones want to support but their eyes, without meaning to, show signs of sadness and distress at being forgotten. The roses were an impetus in her remembering though! So sorry for the delay in responding and take care! =)

        Liked by 1 person

  5. JT Twissel says:

    Whew – she remembers him!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. She sure does! Thank you so much for reading and commenting. =)

      Like

  6. lisarey1990 says:

    Aw, that was lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much, Lisa. Thinking of Valentine’s Day. =)

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Dear Brenda,

    How awful that would be. You’ve captured what it must feel like very well. Beautifully written.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your encouraging comment on the writing. I can’t imagine how awful it would be to forget those closest to me. My dad has dementia, with good days and bad. Have a lovely weekend! =)

      Like

  8. Awww, let’s hope that true love will overcome this hurdle too.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. True love caused her to remember, so I’m rooting for true love! =) Thank you so much for commenting.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. draliman says:

    Sweet, she’s on the road to recovery 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, she is. Thanks for commenting!!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Sandra says:

    So full of hope at the end there. Very nicely done, Brenda

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much, Sandra! =)

      Like

  11. Abhijit Ray says:

    No one should have his / her mind wiped out. What an uncomfortable feeling.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That is certainly true, a disconcerting feeling for sure.

      Like

  12. Hopefully, one memory will lead to another then another. Lovely.

    Click to read my FriFic tale!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That is the hope, the beginning of her memory returning. Love finds a way!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. pennygadd51 says:

    You tell that story with sensitivity and empathy. You made me care for your narrator, so that I felt uplifted by the hopeful signs of recovery at the end. Nice writing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I appreciate your encouraging comments, Penny. Thank you so much!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. csheldonblog says:

    aw I like this story, I’d not say no to sleep for two months though!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. For sure! I’m so glad you enjoyed the story. =)

      Like

  15. Oooh coma; nasty business, lets hope she remembers. Good stuff

    Liked by 1 person

    1. She’s beginning to. Thanks so much for commenting! =)

      Like

  16. plaridel says:

    it’s a long road ahead, but it looks like she’s on her way.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. She certainly is on the road to recovery. =)

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Dale says:

    I felt a squeeze in my heart.
    I agree with Neil, you tackled this oh so well!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very happy you enjoyed the story! Thank you for saying so. =)

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Beautifully told story, as others have said – you convey so much in so few words – & relief there’s a glimpse of hope at the end.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I so glad you enjoyed the story. Thanks so much for commenting! =)

      Like

  19. Violet Lentz says:

    This is so tenderly told. Wonderful!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Violet! =)

      Like

  20. Tannille says:

    The ending really cracks punch! A modern Snowwhite.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s sound nice, a modern Snowwhite. Thank you for your kind comment! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  21. James McEwan says:

    Nice story, although both sad and happy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My stories tend to be kind of sad. But, I try to add ‘with hope’ at the end. Thank you for commenting, James! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Ann Coleman says:

    Very good! I particularly liked the last two lines….love is very powerful indeed!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It certainly is! Thank you so much for your kind comment. =)

      Like

  23. calmkate says:

    Great write up, had me sucked in 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m very glad you enjoyed! Thanks so much for your kind comment. =)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. calmkate says:

        my pleasure 🙂

        Like

  24. gahlearner says:

    Looks like he found the right trigger for her memories, how beautiful that his love is something that remains in her memory despite the trauma. Beautiful story.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. As they say, love finds a way! Thank you so much for your kind somments! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  25. StuHN says:

    Nicely told hold on love.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Awww …. Nicely done! When I worked in the Step-Down Cardiac ICU many many years ago to finance my college studies, I remember a story of an older man who was too restless for the nurse’s liking (his heart rate got all jumpy) and to whose bedside I was sent to keep him company between bedpans and sheets-changes and whatever else the other patients needed. He told me that his wife of many years had passed the year prior, after suffering several strokes. She did not recognize him anymore–or not his face, or voice, at least–but she would know him by his aftershave.
    Na’ama

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Wow, that’s a powerful story. She knew him by smell, he was still in there, a part of her. I’m sure you have many such experiences in your line of work. Thank you so much for telling me of one and for your nice comment. Take care! =)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, I did have many experiences over the years. At the time I was an undergraduate in the Communication Disorders Department, and my work at the Step-down Cardiac ICU was as an ‘unskilled help’ (i.e. basic help for the patients with food, water, bedpans, sheets, errands, etc … and often times when the unit was quiet, with a bit of conversation, as that was part of what helped patients feel better …). I did my schoolwork in between ‘calls’ — I worked the evening shift from 5pm (right after the end of classes) to Midnight or so. I can’t say I remember too many of the patients (this WAS over 30 years ago and many only stayed a day or two before being moved to the ‘regular’ cardiac unit), but some did stick with me. And in the years of clinical work as an Audiologist and Speech Language Pathologist, I have ‘collected’ many more memories of people (babies to elderly) I’ve worked with and their families. Human beings are amazing. 🙂 Na’ama

        Like

      2. Incredible work you’ve done over the years. I’m sure it was difficult at times and of course very intensive. People are indeed amazing, as are you! =)

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Thank you, Brenda! 🙂
        Most people are amazing.
        I have a strong suspicion you are one, too! 🙂
        Na’ama

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Sorry for the slow response. You are very kind! =)

        Liked by 1 person

      5. 🙂 There’s never too late a time to tell me nice things about myself … 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  27. Awww … I love the fact that you left the story with a hopeful ending.
    The trauma of forgetting everything and everyone would be awful.
    Tenderly written, Brenda. I loved it.
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Isadora. I think that is my greatest fear, forgetting those I love. I am happy you enjoyed the story. =)

      Like

  28. How sad…hope she gets her memory back.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Me too, but it is looking good! Thank you for stopping by and sorry for the slow response.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. Oh she is on her way to remember… good thing with roses

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I love roses, so it was a lovely impetus to getting her memory back. At any major event in my married life, my husband nearly always gives me roses. And when he could find them (it has been tricky at times in Asia) he got me yellow roses – my favorite! Thank you for commenting and I’m sorry for the late reply. Tough week!! =)

      Like

  30. Laurie Bell says:

    Awww this has a lovely ending

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Laurie. Hopeful endings are the best but don’t always come to me (haha). Sorry for the delay in responding. =)

      Like

  31. michael1148humphris says:

    An interesting story you have told, makes one think which is good

    Like

    1. Thanks so much, Michael, for reading and responding!! =)

      Like

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