Safe

Aisha dreamed of marrying Sammid, but she was promised to her cousin, Jovan.  Aisha and Sammid were drawn to each other.  After a night of passion, Aisha found herself pregnant. She knew she must run or risk the wrath of her family.  Arriving in the nearest, safest country, she declared “Asylum!”  Agonizing months later, her claim was approved.  She was resettled to a third country where she delivered her baby.  Time passed and Aisha began to relax.

Waiting for a bus, a man sidled up beside her.

“I thought I’d never find you,” Sammid whispered.  Aisha melted into his embrace.

~~

The piece of flash fiction is my contribution to “Friday Fictioneers,” a weekly challenge hosted by the lovely Rochelle Wisoff Fields.  With the help of a photo prompt to inspire, we’re to write a 100-word story.  The photo this week was taken by J. Hardy Carroll.

If you would like to join in with this encouraging group of writers or read their stories from this week, visit HERE.

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36 Comments Add yours

  1. Iain Kelly says:

    Love a happy ending 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I had two version prepared, but the happy ending felt right! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  2. neilmacdon says:

    She was doubly lucky. Few women would be granted asylum because of pregnancy. And then Sammid turned up again

    Liked by 1 person

    1. She was indeed, and you are correct, few are granted asylum for pregnancy. Forced (arranged) marriage and the deadly threats of her family were the main reasons it was granted. Aisha’s tale is based on a true story. =)

      Liked by 2 people

  3. draliman says:

    Phew. With the “sidling up” I was afraid it would be Jovan or her family 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah, I did tease a little. A happy ending was in order though! Thanks for commenting. =)

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I don’t know about the Middle East or Middle Eastern religious groups but Hindu’s in India, and probably those living in other countries, don’t permit marriage to cousins or even those closer than a number of generations. I was told that by my Indian husband and have no reason to doubt it. This was a good romance story though. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Like

    1. Hi Suzanne,

      Like most countries in the world, societal rules differ from north to south, east to west. Amongst the girls we worked with for many years in southern India, arranged marriages with first cousins was common, especially within rural villages. This story mainly focuses on the arranged (forced) marriage issue and threats against Aisha’s life because she broke the betrothal contract and went against her family’s wishes.

      I’m happy you enjoyed the story! =)

      Like

  5. granonine says:

    How lovely to read a story with a happy ending 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much, Linda! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Simply delightful – at last, a story to make us smile!

    My tale – The Flag

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so glad the story made you smile! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Dear Brenda,

    I tensed a bit when the man sidled up to her waiting for the bus. Relief and joy ensued at the happy ending. Well done.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you felt a little suspense but happy you enjoyed the happy ending! Thanks so much, Rochelle. =)

      Like

  8. pennygadd51 says:

    You did well having Sammid sidle up to Aisha – it definitely made me apprehensive on her behalf. I liked the happy ending!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m happy your enjoyed the story and that there was a little suspense for you. =) Thanks so much for your encouraging comments!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. plaridel says:

    who wouldn’t want a happy ending? great story of survival. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We all do that’s for sure! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Ann Coleman says:

    I loved the happy ending! But I also loved that this story wasn’t entirely happy…it’s a good reminder that so many women still don’t have control of their own lives and their own bodies.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Ann, for your thoughtful comment. It is a mind-numbingly sad fact that there are far too many of these women! But, yes, for her it was (and is) a happy outcome. =)

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Dale says:

    Excellent job, Brenda. Especially since it is based on a true story…
    I love a happy ending.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Me too! We all hope for one. =) Thanks so much for your encouragement, Dale!

      Liked by 1 person

  12. DB McNicol says:

    I love happy endings…you had me worried for a bit.

    My take on the photo: https://dbmcnicol.com/friday-fictioneers-declaration/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A little suspense with a happy end is always good. =) Thank you for reading and commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Dan Antion says:

    It’s always impressive what you can say in 100 words.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for such a kind comment, Dan!! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Abhijit Ray says:

    Happy ending. Good that Aisha’s child will have a father.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Very true indeed! Thanks for stopping by. =)

      Like

  15. Laurie Bell says:

    Oh I’m so glad they found each other in the end. And so glad for the happy ending

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, a happy ending is always best. 🙂

      Like

  16. michael1148humphris says:

    I find it hard to understand forced marriages, your story highlighted well the pain such a marriage can inflict

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for reading and commenting, Michael. There is a lot of pain indeed.

      Like

  17. gahlearner says:

    I love the happy ending, and, for once, countires doing the right thing and helping asylum seekers. And yes, being threatened by forced marriage and threats by family is, and should be a reason for asylum.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We’ve seen many granted refugee status over the years. It’s complicated I know. Thanks so much for reading and commenting! =)

      Liked by 1 person

  18. This is an ending we wish that more would have…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That is true! Thank you for commenting. =)

      Like

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