Perspectives

“Did you take the high-chair to the curb?” June asked.

“Yes, but, I don’t think–” he said.

“Back home, we leave the useful stuff.  Someone always picks it up.”

~~

“Who would leave their trash?” Sally sighed. 

“One man’s trash, another man’s treasure, only, this is just trash,” her husband laughed.

~~

Watching from the window, June declared, “A couple is standing by the high-chair.  They’re laughing!”  

He pulled the curtain aside.  “I don’t think–”

“I’m sure they will take it home,” she said gaily. 

He would need to return to the curb when she went to bed.

~~

This story is my contribution to “Friday Fictioneers,” a weekly challenge hosted by the lovely Rochelle Wisoff Fields. With the help of a photo prompt to inspire, we’re to write a 100-word story. The photo this week was provided by Roger Bultot.

If you would like to join in with this encouraging group of writers or read their stories from this week, visit here.

45 Comments Add yours

  1. Tannille says:

    My area leaves the useful stuff up for grabs. But when we use to have the annual dump pick-up the streets could look like this for months. Good story B.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad you enjoyed the story. Thank you for letting me know, T! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I remembered later … When my family and I lived in Melbourne in the early ’90’s, we ended up with a tv we used for my son’s Xbox and an exercise bike we “gathered” on our street. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Tannille says:

        Score! I’m glad you found it. I hate useful things going to the tip.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. ceayr says:

    At least her husband cares for her…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. He certainly does! 🙂

      Like

  3. neilmacdon says:

    I’m intrigued that it matters so much to her that he’s willing to fabricate the event

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good eye, Neil. The story started with June losing her child and she imagined someone taking the chair home and using it for their child. It was a sad version and difficult to communicate sensitively in only 100 words. I wrote two versions and settled on this one. Thank you for commenting!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Sandra says:

    He sounds like a keeper, for sure.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much, Dan. I’m happy you enjoyed. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Dora says:

    The palpable sadness hanging over the couple, all connected to the high chair, and then the two laughing at it: the contrast is truly jarring. Nicely told, Brenda.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so glad you picked up on the emotion and the contrast of the story. Thank you, Dora! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dora says:

        The pleasure is mine, Brenda. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Ann Coleman says:

    Very good, Brenda! It was sad, but also touching…..

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much, Ann, for your encouragement! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. plaridel says:

    quite a thoughtful husband. she’s got winner. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. She certainly does. Thank for commenting, Plaridel!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Iain Kelly says:

    A lot of layers to this, the back story to the chair and the couple, the caring husband and the state of mind of the wife. Great stuff Brenda.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you so much, Iain, for your kind comments. I’m very happy a deeper story below the surface came through!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Both are caring in their own way. I’m sure someone will find some use for it.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Dear Brenda.

    I had to read through this twice. It seems the wife really didn’t want to let go of the highchair and her husband knows it. I’d love to know more.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The wife was of two minds. She lost her little one and imagined the chair going to someone else to use for their child. I wrote two versions. In the other one, the wife said, “Losing our little one, well, I love to imagine–” and the husband responded, “Don’t cry. I’m sure they will take it home,” he said, leading his wife away from the window. He would need to return to the curb when she went to bed. I love that you read it twice and wondered! Thank you, Rochelle. =)

      Like

  11. Bill says:

    Good one. True story: I put a sofa in front yard with a sign: free. No takers, so I changed the sign to $5. It was gone within the hour.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Well, isn’t that curious. =) Thanks so much, Bill.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Dale says:

    This was a beautifully told story, Brenda. So many layers. Her husband is definitely a keeper!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks so much, Dale. He certainly is. He just wants her to be happy. Take care!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. trishsplace says:

    Thoughtful story. Several levels. Lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m so glad you enjoyed the story. I’m also glad the multi-levels came through. Sometimes they don’t with me. 😊 Have a nice weekend!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. James McEwan says:

    I expect recycling has a value – free just doesn’t wash with some people.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, my husband loves to find things for free. When we were first married, I wasn’t sure at all, but now I’m sort of a convert. Whenever we move (which we do a lot), we also try to give our things away. Everyone’s different and that’s okay! 😊 Thanks so much, James, for reading and commenting.

      Liked by 1 person

  15. draliman says:

    He’s a nice husband, one to hang on to.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. He is a keeper for sure! 😊

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Laurie Bell says:

    Oh that happens here. Putting stuff on the curb for pick up and if someone driving past needs something they can take it. I know some families who make a day of it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s great! Where we lived in Hong Kong, there was a spot beside the dumpsters where people could officially leave “nicer” things for someone else to pick up. They do that here in France, a little square space across from the recycling bins. Thanks so much for reading and commenting, Laurie. Stay safe!

      Like

  17. Nobbinmaug says:

    You never know. Sometimes people leave good stuff. Usually not so much. I’m guilty of leaving the free stuff out following a yard sale, but after a few days I cleaned up the leftovers and properly disposed of them. My all-time favorite was someone left a toilet out with a free sign on it. I had to stop, get out, and take a picture. It was years ago, and it’s still funny to me. I can’t believe I didn’t think about that for my story.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hmm, not sure about a used toilet (haha). That might be taking it a little too far. I’m sure there will be another opportunity to use this for a story. It’s good you clean up what people don’t take. I hope you have a nice week ahead!

      Liked by 1 person

  18. ahtdoucette says:

    I’m thinking her husband is probably right.

    Like

    1. Yes, he wanted to save her from any further heartache. Thank you for reading and commenting! 🙂

      Like

  19. So fortunate for the wife that her husband would want to spare her feelings.
    There’s an underlying sadness. I suppose it’s the hidden message that there was a child lost.
    Many, many sad stories this week. Who would have thought one photo could express huge sorrow.
    Have a great day … Be Safe
    Isadora 😎

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It’s true, a lot of sad stories for this one. Thank you for stopping by and you stay safe as well, Isadora!

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s